Mining & Energy Blog, Australia
Monday, March 13, 2017
By Archean Media
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On March 8th 2017, our team had the opportunity to visit the NASA JPL and CSIRO, Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex. Our team was testing advanced industrial drone photography equipment as well as aerial 2D mapping and 3D modelling. While we typically use such aerial equipment and computer modelling software to provide oil and gas companies mapping and photography data for their sites, this visit was a proof of concept, specifically looking at the challenges involved with mapping and photographing the large industrial structures of the radio telescopes.

This type of aerial mapping can be directly deployed and applied to mining and oil and gas projects in Australia and around the globe. Our lightweight systems can be mobilized to drilling locations and mining sites in even the most remote and challenging locations. Such data can provide stunning maps, aerial images and 3D drone models for use in marketing and media development for the mining and energy industry in a number of industrial applications. While onsite we also shot a ground based industrial photography for use in future media. 

 
Friday, February 03, 2017
By Archean Media
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An Abridged Essay on the Principals of Energy Supply Reform Options for continued growth through secure and abundant energy supply.

Our energy consumption has progressed at an unparalleled and clearly demonstrable rate. As individuals and as a collective, we now control more abundant supplies of energy than at any point in our history as a species. During the Stone Age the average Sapiens had approximately 4,000 calories or 16,736 kilo-joules of available energy for all tasks. Now a modern human residing in a developed nation can pull over 200,000 calories or 836,000 kilo-joules of energy on a daily basis. Our species has leveraged this tremendous energy to elevate our status and to vanquish the discomforts and dangers of our prehistory. Our technological capacity, fuelled by abundant energy, has driven back the spectre of famine and abolished the threat of plague, all the while providing an ever-expanding array of luxury. The scientific revolution and subsequent industrial revolution provided an unshakable foundation for this forward progress. The aforementioned revolutions removed our perceived need for religion, delivering incontestable results and vastly superseding the accomplishments of our ancestors. As the demand for energy and raw materials expanded exponentially, luxuries became necessities. Consequently, the culture of our developed nations has largely become disconnected from the trials and hardships of a species without access to a seemingly inexhaustible supply of chemical energy. We have lost the sense of wonder associated with eating tropical fruits in winter or in experiencing on-demand light, heat, modern health care, and innumerable other material resources. These products of the industrial revolution have become the accepted standard, against which any negative deviation is felt as the greatest insult to the innate rights and privileges of citizenship in a developed civilization. Our collective sense of resource-driven entitlement is without bound and has been unchecked by a continued abundance and the fevered pitch of relentless growth.

One modest example of this is the humble refrigerator, an appliance that few in the developed nations are without and an appliance that has been greatly devalued through accessibility and ubiquity. No other large home appliance has had a greater impact on our daily lives than the refrigerator. Prior to the introduction of on-demand

 

electrically driven cold storage, perishable food was readily lost, or consumed in less than optimal condition, resulting in economic loss and the degradation of health. This changed rapidly as advancements in manufacturing techniques and supply logistics moved refrigeration from the privilege of the few wealthy into the domain of the middle class and eventually into the ubiquitous polished steel boxes we take for granted today. As is shown time and time again, luxury becomes perceived necessity as availability increases. Refrigeration is no exception to this rule. Not contented with merely keeping food fresh and cool, the populace quickly demanded ever-larger refrigerators, and a rapid and inexorable arms race among manufacturers ensued. In a remarkably short period of time, refrigerators became monolithic, water-dispensing, ice-producing, internet-equipped, stainless status symbols of suburban fortitude. Often standing and filled to only a fraction of their capacity, refrigerators have be-come a testament to our abundance of inexpensive and abundant energy and mineral resources. This pattern of technological luxury transmuting into daily necessity is the hallmark of our modern capitalist platform. The propagation of this model is the driving force behind our exceptional demand for chemical, mineral and biological resources.

We have, however, not been capable thus far of drawing on this chemical and mineral abundance without consequence or sacrifice. In this modern and largely globalized civilization, all manner of energy and raw material exploration, production and con-sumption is innately intertwined, not only with other members of our species, but with the greater ecological environment as a whole. As a result, our lowest cost, greatest consumption model of culture has shaped an ecological biosphere that is markedly different from the environment in which our Sapiens ancestors foraged for tubers and hunted game. A rapidly shifting climate is but one telling sign of our im-pact on the greater collective global ecology. The populace at large now faces a great paradox of culture: how to continue moving forward with a capitalist, consumption-based infinite growth model without ecological or economic compromise. In short, we expect to have our cake and eat it too. Unfortunately, there is currently no such viable model that allows infinite growth, falling product costs and a zero net impact on the atmospheric and ecological environment. A deal must be struck and a com-promise found within the confines of our economic model, strategic resources and a finite environment. As we move through the 21 st century we will be faced with three clear options for continuing to promulgate our rising global standard of living while, as far as is practicable, limiting our negative impact on the atmosphere and planetary ecology.

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The reform of a government model that allows for vast and unprecedented investment in science, technology and sustainable resource development.

The investment required in generating sustained privilege and standard of living advancement for both developing and developed nations is vast; the investment re-quired in doingso without atmospheric or ecological compromise is many thousands of times greater. Those residing in developed nations are quick to forget that the economic and scientific powerhouse of such nations is the systemic result of the mature fruits of the scientific and industrial revolution, compounded by the vast utili-zation of hydrocarbon resources. This is a revolution that has only just begun to transcend the already developed nations and pick up an unshakable pace throughout the vast developing nations of Asia and Africa. In order to manifest the next scientific and industrial energy revolution, trillions of dollars will need to be invested into research, development and the implementation of an entirely reformedand largely novel energy and material resource production and distribution network. Such in-vestment will need to be driven though the election of a government appointed by the

 

people and firmly charged with securing and employing the financial resources re-quired in transforming our civilization. This is no trifling request, as economically strained governments will be required to seek a larger tax draw on the inhabitants of any given country to fund such a revolution. It is important, however, to remember that elected representatives are rarely appointed to or sustained in office on a platform of advancement through spending funded on increased taxes, no matter how noble the cause. If we accept that it is the role of government to reform our energy and resource platform, we must accept that this will require a sustained modification to our life-style, and furthermore that we will be called on in no small manner to contribute financially and productively. In addition to mass investment, government will need to strongly consider active processes that will seek to limit our collective consumption and, more considerably, our propensity to generate outlandish levels of waste and inefficiency. In democratically elected governments, any negative movements to slow the growth of current market forces and standards of living, or increase taxation, is instantly met with prohibition from entering or removal from office. Until such time as the general public has the long term sustainability and scientific advancement of our species foremost in mind, I expect we will see little in the way of government enthusiasm for unprecedented and sustained resource productionreform.

 

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The continued utilization of market forces and the propagation of private in-vestment as a tool for resource reform and advancement.

Our current global exchange of energy and material resources is the direct represen-tation of a market evolution stretching back nearly ten thousand years. The forces that dictate the value of gold, the availability of gas and the cost of a smart phone are the result of this every evolving landscape of capitalist-driven market forces. The concept of free market forces has driven innovation and scientific advancement and put powerful, globally connected pocket computers in the hands of billions. The energy landscape in 2017 is still largely driven by these same fundamental market forces. In developed nations we demand an unending stream of ever-expanding lux-ury and upward standard-of-living growth, all the while taking action to reduce the direct personal costs incurred. The citizens of developed nations have shown a con-stant tendency to select the most abundant and least expensive energy, material and finished product choices. We are reluctant to invest in green technologies and busi-nesses practicing sound environmental policy if that investment comeswith any innate economic expense or reduction in the quality or abundance of the products delivered. This remains one of the principal driving forces behind the current energy and resource market. Governments and organizations are currently geared to provide their clients, namely the masses that elect and fund them, the products and services those masses are most adamantly requesting. For the last two hundred years this request has been inexorable growth, improved personal power and liberty and a con-tinual reduction in costs. When electric vehicles can deliver the same lifespan, range, utility and performance at a cost that compares with a petrol-powered counterpart, there will be no need for subsidies; market forces will take swift action improving sales. This is the fundamental nature of market forces—large masses of humans seeking to maximize consumption and power while limiting personal and collective economic outlay.

The free market is a clear representation and a metaphorical barometer for the wants, needs and interests of the general public. As it stands, our culture is able and willing to direct tens of billions of dollars into travel, entertainment, and unsurpassed con-sumerism, while actively rejecting any government or organizational action that infringes on these pursuits.

 

If we are to relay on market forces alone as the principle driving force for resource development and atmospheric and ecological damage mitigation, we must immedi-ately shift our collective value structure to place a much greater value on investment into the research, technology and participation with businesses that propagate that goal. It will not be sufficient to merely source our energy and products from respon-sible producers; we will need to actively divest of an overly affluent lifestyle, while directing our personal economic savings directly into the propagation of progress. It will require foregoing the holiday to Europe and investing the funds saved into origi-nations and businesses pushing our species forward. With the nature of our current resource structure, this will not be possibly without leveraging the use of hydrocar-bon energy as a major stop gap over the next 100 years to power our collective progress. While it is out of the scope of an abridged essay to comment comprehen-sively on the ubiquity of hydrocarbon use, it is worth noting that the exploitation of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons is the keystone of our civilization. Any movement to abruptly divest such an intrinsic source would, in all likelihood, result in economic collapse and considerable global hardship, harkening our civilization back to a pre-industrial culture. The next one hundred years will remain predominately powered and influenced by the hydrocarbons extracted from below the ground and the sea.

Our civilization will need to make abundant use of these hydrocarbon resources in setting the stage for our next great leap forward, a leap in which a likely combination of market forces and government action will see unprecedented investment, with emphasis not displaced from the development of sustainable methods for the produc-tion of gaseous and liquid energy resources. These resources are vital and largely irreplaceable in air and sea transport logistics as well as in military and industrial applications. There will be no battery powered battle tanks or ultra-heavy commer-cial aircraft; the physical and mathematical limits governing the energy density contained in batteries are unlikely to be overcome well enough to facilitate such applications.

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Energy and resource reform through unsurpassed gains in efficiency, waste reduction and lifestyle compromise.

It is important to note, first and foremost, that significant gains in efficiency, waste reduction and lifestyle reform have, are and will continue to shape the landscape of resource demand. However, such reforms and advancements will contribute a mar-ginal role in the grand scope of global energy consumption over the next fifty years. The erroneous concept that we can reduce our consumption in developed nations and thus vastly mitigate our atmospheric and ecological footprint is a fanciful and poorly founded fallacy. As the juggernauts of Asia and Africa gear up to make a comprehen-sive and well justified attempt at realizing the standards of living found in developed nations, these countries will be fully entitled to use their share of resources in the attempt to strive for that dream. In developed nations, we have become disconnected from the historical heritage of energy consumption that propelled such nations toward their current precipice of glory and accomplishment. Developed nations have clearly shown that they will be no sooner inclined to reduce their standards of living than developing nations will be in limiting their strive for privilege equality. A full-scale transfiguration of the current cultural and economic model in developed nations would in itself not be enough to reduce atmospheric and ecological impacts to pre-industrial levels. With that being said, however, tremendous gains in efficiency, waste reduction and demand reduction will remain a strong enough agent of change to place cultural modification into the third key position. However, such reform comes with the far from considerable challenges of organizing a species of frail, timid and natu-rally selfish hominid.

 

Two million years of evolution have not well equipped our species to make massive actions of personal reform with altruistic motivation. This is precisely why we do not see those who oppose energy exploration and production protesting in the locations where such resources are most abundantly consumed. The most effective route to abolish the need for hydrocarbons is to abolish the demand. There is no more honest energy reform protest than to encourage others to reduce their hydrocarbon derived energy demands; however, of all the challenges faced by NGO environmental groups, this is perhaps the greatest. Our propensity to stay the course for the sake of maintaining our lifestyle is beyond the sway of any protest, advertisement or environmental-centric campaign. As such, if civilization attempts to forego the personal and governmental investment required to reform our civilization, we will see limited fruit, and most probably default back to a strictly market forces–driven platform. In order to affect dramatic and sustained energy reform, we will need to thoroughly implement the following three platforms to a degree akin to a military campaign. We will use the vast and unrelenting power derived from hydrocarbons to propel the civilization into a higher orbit. The populace of this civilization will need to actively transform the national and global culture to prioritize science, reason and the unwavering march of progress at centre stage, elect leaders willing to harness the full economic fortitude of the people, and push civilization onto such a trajectory. Above all else, this new and transformed culture will need to be willing to personally fund, promote and live these three fundamental platforms.

 

 
Thursday, October 13, 2016
By Archean Media
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Archean Media is your gateway to providing investors and project planers with an unprecedented window into your oil and gas or mining project. We can create drilling and mining maps for marketing, research, advertising and workflow optimization. Our team employs light and mobile, <2kg UAV systems to capture aerial photography as well as to create our large scale Google Earth style overhead maps and 3D models. We specialize in remote operations and quick mining deployment within Australia. Our aircraft and advanced field processing computers can be deployed anywhere in Australia within 12 hours. Our approach can save clients tens of thousands of dollars, when compared to an equal amount of helicopter or heavy fixed wing aircraft engagement. 

Whether you're creating a 3D model of an incident, abnormality or anomaly, or producing a stunning 3D fly though model or Google Earth style map for investors, Archean Media can assist your team in bringing an aerial perspective to your project. For more information on aerial mapping, modeling and photography, please see or website. http://www.archeanmedia.com.au/

Archean Media & PIX4D Mapping

Providing unrepresented aerial mapping for drilling, mining resource exploration and production. Archean Media and PIX4D, providing mapping the the Australian and International resource community.

 
Saturday, October 08, 2016
By Archean Media
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Buying stock shots for oil and gas projects feels like a sensible quick and easy solution to providing photography for your website or annual report, however, nothing could be further from the truth. While stock shots are relatively inexpensive and have almost zero lead time, they do not provide your company and investors with an accurate view into your business and operations. For over half a decade Archean Media has provided photography services for oil and gas and mining operations in Australia and around the glove. We specialize in providing annual report photography and website update photography while also providing aerial mapping and special media project consultation.

Stock photography can serious compromise the reputation and even have serious legal implications if your company is ASX, NSX or TSX listed. It’s critically important that you’re providing your clients and investors an accurate window into your resource project. An incredible set of project photography can have an order of magnitude return on investment when it comes to driving up investment for a mining or oil and gas project. Our team is dedicated to reshaping the status quo for media in the energy and resource market. This means providing our clients with high quality images live and from the field, giving their clients and investors unparalleled project coverage. 

 
Saturday, October 08, 2016
By Archean Media
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The Archean team recently had the opportunity to fly and model a 3D map of a mining operation in Canberra, ACT, Australia. Archean Media specializes in low intrusive aerial mapping and photography for mining and oil and gas drilling and production operations. We can provide high resolution mapping, aerial photography and custom 3D video modeling. Archean Media is provides mining and drilling photography in Australia and around the globe. 

Mapping and 3D modeling at the Boral Hall Quarry. The Boral Quarry located in NSW on the outskirts of Canberra, is one of two hard rock resources Boral operates to support the ongoing expansion of the Australian Capital Territory and surrounds. 35° 5'35.35"S 149° 1'29.50"E

The quarry supplies the aggregates and crushed rock needed to produce materials such as concrete and asphalt, in turn distributed to worksites across Canberra and southern NSW.

PIX4D Boral Rock Mine, Wallaroo, NSW, Australia 2016-10-2

Mapping and 3D modeling at the Boral Hall Quarry. The Boral Quarry located in NSW on the outskirts of Canberra, is one of two hard rock resources Boral operates to support the ongoing expansion of the Australian Capital Territory and surrounds. The quarry supplies the aggregates and crushed rock needed to produce materials such as concrete and asphalt, in turn distributed to worksites across Canberra and southern NSW.